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    Build a Dry Stream Bed Mother Nature Would Be Proud Of Build a Dry Stream Bed Mother Nature Would Be Proud Of

    Build a Dry Stream Bed Mother Nature Would Be Proud Of

Build a Dry Stream Bed Mother Nature Would Be Proud Of

A dry stream bed can be an attractive and functional garden asset.  While yard size will dictate its scale, your imagination will determine how the steam can accent your landscape.  If you have a back yard where drainage is a problem after heavy rains, you can design a feature that stops the rain from pooling, and even keeps the mulch on beds from washing away.

Though primarily used to redirect heavy rainfall, adding stepping stones down the centre will also make a lovely winding path through a narrow garden.  Incorporate a bench or a bridge into your design to make the dry stream an even stronger focal point.  It’s also a great way to add variety and interest to your landscape and showcase specimen plants.  You can place selected species along the edges; plants that spread will add softness to its edges.

However you decide to create your dry stream bed, it’s important to make it look as though it naturally belongs in your garden by using curves, varying its width and adding assorted stone sizes.

If you are building your dry stream to control runoff, start by making sure your grade is correct by following your yard’s natural drainage pattern.  The […]

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    DIY Twig Garden Fence DIY Twig Garden Fence

    DIY Twig Garden Fence

DIY Twig Garden Fence

Need a cost effective, environmentally conscious fence or garden room divider?  Build it yourself with pruned twigs and branches from trees and shrubs.

Pound two rows of poles (pressure-treated tree stakes or steel T-bars work well) 60 centimetres into the ground one metre apart, with the rows 45 centimetres apart and parallel to each other.  Then, simply start laying your pruned branches horizontally between the poles, making sure that each branch spans at least two posts in order to hold it in place.  Use primarily deciduous branches if you can, but anything goes.  New branches can be added as the older ones settle, making space for more.

The fence makes a great trellis for annual, perennial or vegetable vines.  They love to weave their stems through the branches, further strengthening and binding the fence together.  Once you get started, you’ll find yourself scoping out your neighbourhood for more branches to feed your fence.  The prunings are transformed from waste into a beautiful, natural and unique addition to any garden.